Search found 10 matches

Return

Re: How much can it handle?

This kind of synthetic test just won't tell you anything meaningful - projects are so much more complex than this.

Different patches in VSTi's can take different amounts of processor power, even subtle tweaks to effects can add or subtract processor time.

The best bet is to not worry until you reach the limit of the computer, then either adjust the ASIO buffer accordingly or bounce some of the tracks.

You'll spend valuable time trying to work out something that is irrelevant - why not spend that time writing some music? - and what if your test tells you you can only make songs to a certain complexity? - will you decide to only write songs that are that complex?

T Shark
by TobyShark
Mon Apr 14, 2014 2:03 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Steinberg DJ-friendly Audio Interface

The UR44 would be fine for DJing, it has the independent outputs you need for monitoring and live mix and low latency drivers.
by Strophoid
Sun Oct 26, 2014 1:37 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Steinberg DJ-friendly Audio Interface

You need an audio interface with at least 4 outputs for that, one stereo pair for monitoring and one stereo pair for playback. All Steinberg audio interfaces have at least 4, with the exception of the UR22 which has only 2.
All of these should work just fine with both Ableton and Cubase.
by Strophoid
Mon Apr 21, 2014 12:33 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Steinberg DJ-friendly Audio Interface

Yep, I agree that is a shame. Then again these aren't really designed for DJ work, they've got lots of features you just don't need as a DJ (No sane DJ will use a phantom powered condenser mic, let alone 4 :P).
by Strophoid
Mon Apr 21, 2014 1:16 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Steinberg DJ-friendly Audio Interface

I would not worry about output level of the headphone amp, although 'loud enough' is not very clearly defined and is also very dependent on your headphone impedance.

Personally I would never buy the Novation for studio work. It has no useful inputs other than a single stereo RCA which is completely useless if you ever want to record a microphone or guitar for instance.

I have no experience with Ableton, the only DJing I ever did was with Traktor. With traktor however, cueing was very easy in the software and also on the hardware controller I had. I never felt the need for a button on my audio interface for that purpose.

It's your decision of course, but the UR44 is simply much better for studiowork and although the Novation may have a slight functional edge for DJing, the UR44 is also fine for that.

If you are still in doubt, you can try to find a local dealer that will let you testdrive the UR44 with ableton, just to see if that floats your boat.
by Strophoid
Mon Oct 27, 2014 11:59 am
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Cubase 8 Trial

Come on, it's not like it's June now ;)
by Ed Doll
Thu Dec 04, 2014 4:04 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Understanding Control Room

The Control Room is an abstract way of managing your monitoring so that you don't have to change target output connections on your hardware, nor on individual channels or sends to change between speakers, phone or cue mixes.

For your Focusrite, I would suggest that the connection arrangement would be:
a) Cubase Input channels:
_ a) Mic --> In 01, named as 'Vocal'.
_ b) Guitar --> In 02, as 'Guitar'.
_ Note that you can use the same physical inputs for multiple Input channels, which means that you could also have:
_ c) Stereo mic pair --> In 1 + 2, named as 'Acoustic'.

These can be set up differently in each Cubase Input channel, such as having filters, are then possible sources for Audio channels, but you have to make sure you correctly set the LINE/INST switch on the Focusrite for the Input channel currently being recorded.

b) Cubase Output channels are left not connected.

c) Control Room:
_ a) LINE OUTPUT 1 + 2 --> Speakers, , as 'Speakers', using the BALANCED or UNBALANCED connections as required.
_ b) LINE OUTPUT 3 + 4 --> Headphones, as 'Phones', but make sure the HEADPHONE SOURCE is set to '3+4' on the Focusrite.

This enables you to use the Control Room to switch between the Phone and Speakers, but also allows having different plugins for each, such as having a room compensation plugin, such as IK Multimedia's ARC, inserted into the speaker feed, or different EQ settings for each.


You do not have enough output channels on the Focusrite to provide any cue/foldback feeds. If you did, Control Room would allow you to put a reverb plugin (though advisably not too CPU-intensive) on the vocalist cue mix, while keeping what is recorded reverb-free.
by Patanjali
Wed Feb 25, 2015 12:09 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Understanding Control Room

It's difficult gauging the level of comprehension of a given user when asking a question. I don't usually go into great detail unless necessary. Well done Patanjali ;)

Regarding limited output channels however, since the OP is recording himself, the Line Outs 3 + 4 can double as Cue Mix Phone outs. Setup both a Phones out (am I to assume the Focusrite has no phones out?) and an Artist Cue. When recording, enable the outs in the control room for the cue, and when mixing, disable these and activate the outs for the phones.
This way a separate cue mix can be had on the Cue phones when recording if necessary without upsetting the main mix.

FWIW: Regarding plugins for the phones, Beyerdynamic has a freebie plugin for phones which simulates different listening environments.
by BriHar
Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:01 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic

Re: Steinberg's dongle alternative coming

In the course of this year, we will introduce new and shorter USB-eLicensers which should be more robust.
by Ed Doll
Wed Mar 18, 2015 3:10 pm
 
Jump to forum
Jump to topic