Interpreting notation in an old score

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k_b
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Re: Interpreting notation in an old score

Post by k_b » Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:03 am

Rob Tuley wrote:
Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:07 pm
I once remember trying to accompany a violinist who played the Gounod-Bach "Ave Maria" as an encore (which we hadn't rehearsed!) and seemed to be convinced there were only 7 16th-notes in a half-note, for the entire piece. After a few bars I just gave up and only played 7 out of every 8 notes - and the violinist's only comment was "that went well, apart from the beginning" :x
Interesting, I had a similar experience with exactly the same piece. A lady amateur singer wanted to sing the “Ave Maria” at a church event, so we rehearsed at her place. I had problems to keep up with her rhythm. Later she played me her favourite recording of this piece on her grammophone. It was a very old recording of a famous singer with orchestral accompaniment. At that point I noticed, that she had learnt the music from that recording exactly 1:1 ...
Last edited by k_b on Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

Robert Enns
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Re: Interpreting notation in an old score

Post by Robert Enns » Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:20 am

I love the Gerald Moore story. Singers are the worst. But we love them don't we? Don't we?

I'm supposed to accompany a singer later this month but bless her, I'm not likely to get the music much before and there won't be much rehearsal time judging from previous occasions. But we cope.

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k_b
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Re: Interpreting notation in an old score

Post by k_b » Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:38 am

Robert Enns wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:20 am
I love the Gerald Moore story. Singers are the worst. But we love them don't we? Don't we?
I guess there is some subconscious jealousy involved. As an instrumentalist one might think, music can be done by producing the right notes, tempo, pitch, rhythm, expression etc. - the “technical” aspect of it.
So why is a singer more successful, if some of these aspects seem to be lacking??
They might have the ability to reach the audience in another way, make them cry - for whatever reason ;-)

Talking about opera: very simply said, drama and theatre started with just spoken words. Later music was added, as it seemed to work well. In the mean time, music has sometimes taken over the drama and got “too” important... [end off topic]

david-p
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Re: Interpreting notation in an old score

Post by david-p » Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:48 am

k_b wrote:
Thu Aug 10, 2017 1:03 am
A lady amateur singer wanted to sing the “Ave Maria” at a church event, so we rehearsed at her place. I had problems to keep up with her rhythm. Later she played me her favourite recording of this piece on her grammophone. It was a very old recording of a famous singer with orchestral accompaniment. At that point I noticed, that she had learnt the music from that recording exactly 1:1 ...
For this very reason, I have always forbidden members of the choirs I have directed from listening to recordings. There is almost always at least one spot where the rhythm or pitch is questionable, and, if allowed to, they always leaarn this passage verbatim!

David
David Pickett, Vienna, Austria
Sibelius 7 user from way back when, and can still use a pen and m.s. paper.
Editor of orchestral and keyboard (early music) scores and occasional composer.
Organ, harpsichord, conductor, audio producer and engineer.
http://www.fugato.com/pickett

John Ruggero
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Re: Interpreting notation in an old score

Post by John Ruggero » Thu Aug 10, 2017 3:37 pm

Just to continue this delightfully OT diversion…
k_b wrote:
Sun Aug 06, 2017 3:11 pm
A musicologist claimed, that Brahms’s music incorporates a feeling of constant fatigue.
Oh dear...
ps: I do like Brahms ;-)
Brahms music, like Bach's, has often been played in a heavy, boring way, particularly by pianists. Both composers' music should be played lightly and with rhythmic spring and flexibility. When one thinks of the Academic Festival Overture, the brilliant and exhilarating finales to his symphonies, concerti and chamber works—like the Gypsy finale to the Gm Piano Quartet— the man had "rhythm in every bone of his body", just like Bach.

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